November
17
Filed Under (Sports) by Justin on 2005-11-17

SnipeSwipe did it for me again! Grabbed four good seats in the lower-level of the Smith Center for Saturday nights game. Already paid, confirmed through PayPal and talked with the seller. The tix are on there way via FedEx! And I still haven’t heard from the seller of the original auction. I hope PayPal sees things my way on the dispute. It’s been almost 20 hours now – and not a single word in my inbox from the loser.

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November
17
Filed Under (Geekspeak) by Justin on 2005-11-17

I might be in trouble – my won auction has disappeared from “my eBay” and since the end of the auction at 6:00 PM Eastern last night, I’ve heard nary a word from the seller. Fishy? I’m contacting eBay/PayPal now to retract my bid and cancel payment. From the item listing:

 Payment must be made immediately upon auction’s end.  Tickets will ship immediately upon payment.

Seems a bit hypocritical, yes? Expects IMMEDIATE payment but can’t respond in 16 hours from the end of the auction? He had good ratings too. Stupid eBay.

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November
17
Filed Under (Sports) by Justin on 2005-11-17

Well, I snagged the tickets I needed to get into the basketball game on Saturday night. It’s going to be a long day. Me and the guys are leaving Shelby around 7:00 AM to get to the football game and then probably won’t get back in town until 2:30 or 3:00 AM Sunday morning. Sigh. It’s so gonna be worth it.

 

Update: Forgot to mention – after I got “sniped” out of the good seats, I wasn’t taking any more chances and enlisted the help of SnipeSwipe and it worked like a charm. Your first snipe is free – so if there’s an important auction out there you MUST win – I recommend SnipeSwipe.

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November
16
Filed Under (Geekspeak, Linux, Work) by Justin on 2005-11-16

OK, BetaNews is running this story: Windows Thrashes SUSE Linux in Study, and I feel strongly obligated to take a few moments to respond. (Brandon – feel free to back me up here. 🙂 Part of their argument does indeed hold some water, but not enough to justify the headline. First of all, I think we need to start with this quote:

The report by Security Innovation was funded by Microsoft and examined the long-term usage of both Windows and Linux environments.

I don’t really want to make sweeping accusations, but I just wonder if Novell funded the study, which way the results would’ve came out then. Gotta know your sources, and more importantly, who pays the salaries of those sources. Then if you head over to the Security Innovations website, you’ll find this press release announcing that Microsoft named SI’s executives “Microsoft Most Valuable Professionals” or MVPs. Too funny. Anyhow, the story on BetaNews continues with some excerpts like these:

Specifically, Linux administrators took 68 percent longer to implement new business requirements than their Windows counterparts, and the “Novell SLES solution experienced 14 critical breakages while the Windows Server solution experienced none,” Microsoft said.

This is where I think they might be on to something. In my experience, yes, it may take a little longer to implement a Linux solution, but in the end, for myself and my employer, it’s been worth it EVERY. SINGLE. TIME.

According to Microsoft, Novell’s solution also required 4.79 times the number of patches, and only one of three Linux administrators met all of the requirements.

This may also be statistically correct – but I don’t see the real relevance. I’d like to see the study dig into how many known vulnerabilities still exist in both platforms and also how quickly the companies come to the rescue when a new one is discovered. Personally, I’d rather run SuSE’s YaST Online Update (YOU) once a week and install any patches necessary for security rather than wait for Microsoft’s monthly “Patch Tuesday” that we all know and love. (insert eyeroll) We’re all familiar with what happens after installing a patch on Windows – Server or otherwise. DING! A REBOOT! Let me close by stating a case: About a year ago, we setup a server at work, running SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 9 (SLES9). More or less it was meant to be a “sandbox” but since then, it’s turned out to be an invaluable resource for my company, doing things that we wouldn’t even dream of doing on a Windows platform. Oh wait, hang on, the server has something he wants to say to you all:

jmoore@linuxhost:~> uptime 2:38pm up 163 days 6:57, 1 user, load average: 0.01, 0.01, 0.00

See, Linux speaks for itself. No studies needed afterall.

Note: For what it’s worth, I’m not a Microsoft “hater” at all. We have several servers at my place of employment that run Windows 2000 Server. Each server has a purpose – some of those purposes ARE better suited for Windows – some for Linux. That silly study fails to mention that part.

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November
16
Filed Under (Geekspeak) by Justin on 2005-11-16

Is it too much to ask for a “Archive this one and go to Next New Message” type button? I use twice as many clicks as I should have to to read through all my new mailing list message and then go back later, select each one by checking the box, and then archiving. There’s just not a good way to do this that I’m aware of. They keyboard shortcut “y then o” almost does it, but I have my messages sorted with newest and top so “next” actually goes to the next older message – not new ones.

Come on fellow bloggers – if you use Gmail for any more than 5 minutes a day, you know what I’m talking about – let’s make some noise and see if we can’t get Google to listen.

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November
16
Filed Under (Geekspeak, Politics) by Justin on 2005-11-16

Not that I expected any lessthis is good news anyway. CmdrTaco provided this bit of comedic relief in his Slashdot posting:

A new body will be created to provide international oversight, which will, of course, have no binding authority.

Just what we need in the world – another powerless, opinionated organization. At least it will give the media something to write about.

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November
15
Filed Under (Geekspeak) by Justin on 2005-11-15

I tried twice. First time I didn’t expect such results: Windows+Firefox…

MTV_FFXWIN_warning

The second time, I sorta expected this:

MTV_FFXLIN_warning

Oh well.

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November
15
Filed Under (Sports) by Justin on 2005-11-15

Lucas: UNC Basketball Mailbag November 15

There’s no maybe about it–this year’s team is definitely the youngest ever. In fact, no team in ACC history has ever lost its top seven scorers, as the Tar Heels did after winning the national championship.
There are two previous examples of Carolina teams losing their top three scorers–prior to the 1995-96 season (losing Jerry Stackhouse, Rasheed Wallace, and Donald Williams) and prior to the 1998-99 season (losing Vince Carter, Antawn Jamison, and Shammond Williams). The 1996 team finished 21-11 and lost to backboard-breaking Darvin Ham and Texas Tech in the NCAA second round. The 1999 team finished 24-10 and lost to Weber State in the NCAA opener.
One advantage both of those teams had over this one: they both returned experienced point guards.

Sigh. It’s going to be a long season I’m afraid.

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